The Not A Cornfield Project Blog + Podcast

This is the official blog of the Not A Cornfield project, a living sculpture in the form of a field of corn. The project is located just North of downtown Los Angeles on a large stretch of land well known as “The Cornfield.”

Sundays @ Not A Cornfield
DRUM CIRCLE + CORN PLANTING + ORAL HISTORY BOOTH +
STORY SERIES
SUNDAY AUGUST 21 @ 3-7pm



Growing in the historic center of Los Angeles, the Not A Cornfield project transforms an industrial brownfield site into a cornfield for one agricultural cycle. Now the Los Angeles Historic State Park, the site popularly known as 'The Cornfield' has remained derelict for more than a decade. Serving as both a potent metaphor and as a means of cleansing the soil, the planting of the corn reclaims this lost fertile area and aims to give a focus for reflection and action in a city unclear about the location of its energetic and historic center.

Sundays @ Not A Cornfield brings people together into a hand-planted "eye" within the mechanically planted cornfield in order to work, talk and make music together, thereby bringing a communal energy to the project and allowing the handmade versus mechanically-made edge to hum.


Interpretive Tours 3pm

Drum Circle w/ musician Michael McCall 4-6pm

BRING A DRUM OR INSTRUMENT

Corn Planting w/ gardener Jaime Lopez 4-6pm

Oral History Booth w/ RadioSonideros 4-6pm (at Millie's)

Story Series -- Ralph Lopez-Urbina In Conversation with Susan Phillips regarding graffiti and the L.A. River 6pm

Lauren Bon's recent urban, public and land art projects have included actions in Northern Ireland, Hong Kong, Belgrade and Los Angeles. Her sculptures, installations and other works have been exhibited at venues around the world, including the UCLA Hammer Art Museum, the Santa Monica Museum of Art; and the Museum of Modern Art, Belfast. Bon holds a Masters of Architecture degree from MIT and a BA from Princeton.

Susan A. Phillips is the author of "Wallbangin: Graffiti and Gangs in L.A." and is currently director of the Center for California Cultural and Social Issues at Pitzer College. Her interest in the L.A. River as a graffiti space led her to document graffiti there dating to 1914. She continues to teach and write about gang culture.

Ralph "Rafas" Lopez-Urbina grew up in Dog Town/Lincoln Heights in the '30s and '40s, swimming in the L.A. River and writing in tar on the rail tracks. In 1968, he founded Con Safos, the Chicano literary journal. He taught Chicano Studies and English at Cal State Dominguez Hills, and now writes from his home in Baldwin Park.

Not A Cornfield
1201 North Spring Street
Phone: 323.226.1158
Always free to the public, handicapped accessible
Free parking at South and North Gates

DIRECTIONS (SOUTH GATE): From the intersection of North Spring and College (Gold Line - Chinatown stop) take 
North Spring north 2 blocks to the northern end of the project site. The entrance is on the left, co-located at 1799 Baker Street.

For more information, a live webcam, and a map, please visit the Not A Cornfield website
www.notacornfield.info

Friday Nights @ Not A Cornfield


Artist Salon: Lauren Bon
In Conversation with Janet Owen Plus, "Corn in European Painting," special guest presentation by Felicity Powell and Ansel Krut

FRIDAY AUGUST 19 @ 7:30pm



Growing in the historic center of Los Angeles, the Not A Cornfield project transforms an industrial brownfield site into a cornfield for one agricultural cycle. Now the Los Angeles Historic State Park, the site popularly known as 'The Cornfield' has remained derelict for more than a decade. Serving as both a potent metaphor and as a means of cleansing the soil, the planting of the corn reclaims this lost fertile area and aims to give a focus for reflection and action in a city unclear about the location of its energetic and historic center.

Friday Nights @ Not A Cornfield brings people together in order to share, engage, energize, and enhance the organic nexus that is this project.

Lauren Bon's recent urban, public and land art projects have included actions in Northern Ireland, Hong Kong, Belgrade and Los Angeles. Her sculptures, installations and other works have been exhibited at venues around the world, including the UCLA Hammer Art Museum, the Santa Monica Museum of Art; and the Museum of Modern Art, Belfast. Bon holds a Masters of Architecture degree from MIT and a BA from Princeton.

Janet Owen is the founding director of the AIM international festival of time-based media and currently co-director of Raid Projects. She has organized exhibitions and related events with, among others, MOCA (LA); the Hong Kong Art Center; the Santa Monica Museum of Art; and Kiasma, Finland. Her texts have appeared in various exhibition catalogs; magazines including 'RiM' and 'Le Rouge'; and the essay anthology 'Kolibri' (Revolver, 2003).

Felicity Powell is a London-based artist whose work can be seen in the collections of the V&A museum and the British Museum. Her research in collaboration with the V&A was funded by the AHRB. Her recent video work shown at Domo Baal is touring to Thailand with the British Council. She lectures at University College Falmouth, City and Guilds and the National Gallery London. She has BA in Fine Art from Falmouth, an MA in sculpture from the Royal Academy and won the Gulbenkian Rome Scolarship in Sculpture to the British School in Rome.

Ansel Krut is a painter who is the current fellow in Drawing at Wimbeldon College of Art. He lectures at The Royal College of Art and the National Gallery. His work is in the Arts council and British council collections and has been shown internationally. He is represented by Domo Baal Gallery, London. He has a B.A. from University of the Witwatersrand.Johannesburg and an MA from the Royal College of Art London. He was awarded the Abby Major scholarship to the British school in Rome.

Not A Cornfield
1201 North Spring Street
Phone: 323.226.1158
Always Free to the Public, Handicapped Accessible
Free Parking at South and North Gates

DIRECTIONS (NORTH GATE): From the intersection of North Spring and College (Gold Line - Chinatown stop) take
North Spring north 3 blocks to the northern end of the project site. The entrance is on the left, co-located at 1799 Baker Street.

For more information, live Webcam, and a map, please visit the Not A Cornfield website
www.notacornfield.info

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Morning
A Dance Performance at Not A Cornfield
SATURDAY AUGUST 20 @ 7am

Growing in the historic center of Los Angeles, the Not A Cornfield project transforms an industrial brownfield site into a cornfield for one agricultural cycle. Now the Los Angeles Historic State Park, the site popularly known as 'The Cornfield' has remained derelict for more than a decade. Serving as both a potent metaphor and as a means of cleansing the soil, the planting of the corn reclaims this lost fertile area and aims to give a focus for reflection and action in a city unclear about the location of its energetic and historic center.

"Morning" is about the collective experiencing of imagery. Four dancers -- Roxanne Steinberg, Boaz K Barkan, Jamie Burris, and Oguri -- offer up their own stories to the cornfield, honored to take part in an evocative and fleeting dialog between people and place.

Lauren Bon's recent urban, public and land art projects have included actions in Northern Ireland, Hong Kong, Belgrade and Los Angeles. Her sculptures, installations and other works have been exhibited at venues around the world, including the UCLA Hammer Art Museum, the Santa Monica Museum of Art; and the Museum of Modern Art, Belfast. Bon holds a Masters of Architecture degree from MIT and a BA from Princeton.

Roxanne Steinberg is involved in many aspects of dance and theater production. Her performances and staging concepts have been seen in theaters, galleries, parks, abandoned factories, film, video and opera. She is a founder of Body Weather Laboratory in L.A. (1988), and the La Boca performance space (1991). She formed the Renzoku dance company with Oguri in 1994 and is an artist-in-residence at the Electric Lodge in Venice where she continues to teach Body Weather Laboratory.

Boaz K Barkan, originally from Tel Aviv, Israel, began dancing during his army service and in 1990 moved to the USA. Since 1998 Barkan has been performing and conducting BWL in New York, collaborating with artists such as Kenta Nagai, Raz Mesinai, DD Dorvilier, Marina Rosenfeld. Barkan has also been working with Anna Halprin’s art/life process at the Sea Ranch retreat since 1997, and recently performed at the Pompidou Center in Paris as part of the Halprin collective.

Jamie Burris joined Body Weather Laboratory in 1993 and has since danced in over 50 performances domestically and abroad as well as co-facilitating BWL workshops with long time collaborators Oguri and Steinberg. She has also worked with numerous LA based artists in dance, film, music and fashion. Most recently she danced with Oguri in "HOME" at The Electric Lodge and choreographed the short dance film, "Blogopolis." Burris has also created and performed solo works at La Boca, CSU San Bernadino, Glaxa Studios, Tsunami and Highways Performance Space.

Oguri, a native of Japan, studied radical visual arts, which led to his career as a performer and dancer. He studied with master Tatsumi Hijikata, the creator / inventor of Butoh dance. A resident of Southern California since 1990 he conducts Body Weather Laboratory a forum for investigating the body and dance (founded by Min Tanaka in Japan, 1978). Oguri received the Irvine Fellowship in Dance for Height of Sky, a project that took place in the deserts of Joshua Tree. It explored the development of his identity as a Japanese dancer in America.

Not A Cornfield
1201 North Spring Street
Phone: 323.226.1158
Always free to the public, handicapped accessible
Free parking at South and North Gates

DIRECTIONS (NORTH GATE): From the intersection of North Spring and College (Gold Line - Chinatown stop) take
North Spring north 3 blocks to the northern end of the project site. The entrance is on the left, co-located at 1799 Baker Street.

For more information, a live webcam, and a map, please visit the Not A Cornfield website
www.notacornfield.info

First School Group Takes Tour

Twenty-two second graders and their teachers from Buchanan Street Elementary spent their Wednesday, August 17 morning and mid-day at Not A Cornfield. The group was the first of many such planned school trips to the art project site. The kids took a docent-led walking tour, spoke with gardener Jaime Lopez, planted seeds, ate lunch, and played educational “fun facts” games.

History and Perception at Heart of Evening

Solano Canyon community activist Alicia V. Brown spoke to rapt Sundays @ Not A Cornfield participants on Sunday, August 14, providing an eloquent “Story Series” bridge between the weekly Interpretive Tours + Drum Circle + Corn Planting and the evening’s setting sun.

Among other topics, Brown discussed the micro-history of Solano Canyon, her longtime neighborhood. The retired teacher also talked about the surrounding areas, and the Not A Cornfield site itself. Brown brought with her a model of an early Los Angeles water wheel, relevant considering Not A Cornfield’s location 150 feet from the L.A. River, and about twenty feet from the Zanja Madre.

Story Series curator Hilary Kaplan introduced Brown and gave an eloquent presentation of her own, explaining terms such as “water shed” and “view shed” and speaking more conceptually about perception and other related topics.

Sundays @ Not A Cornfield happens every Sunday, 3-7pm. Interpretive Tour + Drum Circle + Corn Planting + Story Series. This Sunday, 8/21: Ralph “Rafas” López-Urbina and Susan A. Phillips, L.A. River graffiti experts, in conversation.

Zanja Madre Further Uncovered

During the past few days, MTA work crews have labored to clear and uncover more of the red bricks that once composed the Zanja Madre, or “Mother Ditch” – Los Angeles’ first water system. The Zanja Madre is located just a few meters from the Not A Cornfield project, across the train tracks, to the west, and clearly visible from the walking path.

This portion of the architectural artificact was unearthed in April, by MTA workers clearing space for a gold-line-adjacent asphault service road. At least a 70-foot section was located, only a small portion of which was visible until the past few days.